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While most of our kids really don’t need more toys, some loved ones, especially grandparents, are known to go over-the-top anyway for the holidays. But one grandma came up with the best alternative to giving her grandkids more stuff - she gave them the gift of time instead and made it an adventure.

Last Christmas, Darlene Waller gave her two oldest grandsons an “adventure box.” Her 11 and nine-year-old grandsons unwrapped a chest filled with envelopes and a note explaining that she was giving them family time adventures for their Christmas presents.

Each boy received 12 envelopes, labeled one per month with a specific theme. Inside each one is a different preplanned and paid date for them with grandma, them with their parents, or them with their aunt and uncle. “Some you choose, some I choose,” the note explains. “But they are all fun as a family activity for us to do together.”

The kids have to wait to open an envelope at the beginning of each month to see what surprise they could look forward to, including activities like going to the movies, laser tag, bowling, and a baseball game. Waller’s grandson’s loved it and their parents did too because it gave them time together making memories and didn’t add any toys they lose interest in to the clutter.

Source: The Stir


A lot of people have probably already gotten their Christmas trees, or about to get them, and as we get closer to Christmas there will probably be a lot less trees to choose from. But there will always be some trees that don’t get sold during the holidays, which does seem like a waste. Well, did you ever wonder what happens to all those trees? 

Well, according to Rocco Malanga, the owner of Cedar Grove Christmas Trees in Cedar Grove, New Jersey, a lot of those unused trees wind up getting chopped up for mulch, although some go to farms for livestock. Still, Malanga notes, “But if we've done our job correctly, there's not a lot that we have to deal with."

But those aren’t the only uses for unused Christmas trees. Some trees actually go to the beach  to help areas that suffered erosion, some of which were the result of hurricanes. The trees can be fastened together and held down to trap sand. Dry trees can also break down to help create sand dunes, which will protect areas during storms because they absorb the impact of winds and waves.

Trees are also used to help restore coastal marshes, and in Illinois they’ve been used to create nesting structures for endangered herons. They’ve also been fed to goats in San Francisco, and even dropped in lakes in South Dakota to improve fish habitats.

Source: USA Today


We all know traveling can be a nightmare these days, especially during the holidays, and there are definitely certain things travelers deal with that are more annoying than others. We all have our complaints about getting on planes and dealing with airports, and now 24/7 Wall Street has revealed the biggest air travel complaints of the year, based on complaints most frequently filed with the Department of Transportation (DOT). 

So, what do people complain about most? Not surprising, it's baggage, with 2,131 complaints coming in this year related to lost, damaged or delayed baggage, as well as charges for excess baggage, carry-on problems, and difficulties with airline claims. Overall, the worst month for baggage complaints was August, with American Airlines the worst performing airline.

Top Ten Biggest Air Travel Complaints Of 2018

  1. Baggage
  2. Cancellation
  3. Reservations, Ticketing, Boarding
  4. Customer Service
  5. Delays
  6. Fares
  7. Refunds
  8. Disability
  9. Misconnection
  10. Other (including frequent flyers, cargo problems, security, airport facilities, and claims for bodily injury)

Source: USA Today


Any parent will tell you they are forced to listen to some truly annoying music to make their kids happy, but many will do whatever they can to make sure their kids eventually grow out of that and listen to something good. Well, it turns out, parents don’t have many years to influence that musical taste. 

A new survey by Deezer finds the latest parents have to influence their kids musical tastes is age 10, with 82% of parents saying their kids are still open to hearing new music until that age. But once they hit ten forget about it. The survey notes that after that age, they are more likely to dislike music they don’t know or hear often.

And a kid's musical taste is really important to a lot of moms and dads. In fact, 85% say it’s important their kids experience different musical styles, although parents do hope their kids wind up sharing their own taste in music. It seems 75% of parents try to get their kids to like their favorite songs. And apparently dads are more invested in kids sharing their musical taste, with 83% of fathers wanting them to have the same taste in music, as opposed to 60% of mothers.

Source: Today


We all know lots of folks like to share photos of their food on social media, but a new poll shows just how bad things are getting.

A new UK poll, which could easily translate here, finds that 40% of diners post pictures of their meals on social media when they’re dining out, with more than a quarter doing so to impress friends and followers. In fact, sharing pics is so important that 20% of diners wish restaurants would install better lighting to improve the quality of their photos.

And it sounds like restaurants should be happy that folks are sharing pictures of dishes, because a restaurant's online presence is important to most diners. The poll finds that one-fifth of diners are influenced by a restaurant’s website and social media presence when choosing where to dine. Another 21% will check a restaurant’s website and social media accounts to see what their food looks like, with 15% not willing to go to a restaurant at all if they don’t have a social media presence online.

Source: SWNS Digital

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